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Chilling: How Bad Have Our Youth Been Warped?

How many of those teen ‘beatdown’ cell phone videos have you seen over these last few years? You know the ones where kids are standing around taunting and cheering while recording the assault on their cell phones from every angle as one or more other students beat the shit out of a helpless student. Teens attacking innocent passersby in the “knockout game”. Posing in front of mirrors and taking selfies with guns.

Read this, and then reflect on why, over these past couple decades, it has become so easy for irrational kids to rationalize mass murder … not just in schools, but in cities like Chicago…

Washington Times: ‘Who are you to judge?’

“The Lottery” is a classic short story written by Shirley Jackson in 1948. It’s the tale of a rural, farming community in America of about three hundred residents. The town seems normal by all accounts as it prepares for a traditional, harvest-time event known as The Lottery.

Each year the name of every family is written on a piece of paper and securely stored in a locked box. On the morning of the annual gathering, the heads of each household draw from the box until a paper slip with a black spot is extracted. One of these clans is that of the “Hutchensons.”

Upon “winning” this first phase of the lottery, each member of the Hutchinson family joins the father to select another slip of paper out of another box until one member of that family — the mother, named Tessie — draws a piece of paper with the final black spot on it.

In spite of her cries, the townspeople, including her own husband and children, pick up rocks and stone her to death to ensure a more prosperous harvest.

For some 70 years, “The Lottery” has rightly been included in many literary anthologies for its shocking portrayal of the power of groupthink and the human inclination to accept evil.

For more than 30 years beginning in 1970, English professor Kay Haugaard used the story to spur corresponding discussions in her literature class at Pasadena City College. Ms. Haugaard says she could always count on some common reactions:

[…]

“The story always impressed the class with the insight that I felt the author had intended: the danger of just ‘going along’ with something habitually, without examining its rationale and value. In spite of the changes that I had witnessed over the years in anthologies and in students’ writing, Jackson’s message about blind conformity always spoke to my students’ sense of right and wrong.”

Then in the 1990s, something started to change dramatically in how her students responded to the sobering tale. Rather than being horrified by it, some claimed they were bored by it, while others thought the ending was “neat.”

When Ms. Haugaard pressed them for more of their thoughts, she was appalled to discover that not one student in the class was willing to say the practice of human sacrifice was morally wrong! She describes one interaction with a student, whom she calls Beth:

“‘Are you asking me if I believe in human sacrifice?’ Beth responded thoughtfully, as though seriously considering all aspects of the question. ‘Well, yes,’ I managed to say. ‘Do you think that the author approved or disapproved of this ritual?’

“I was stunned: This was the [young] woman who wrote so passionately of saving the whales, of concern for the rain forests, of her rescue and tender care of a stray dog. ‘I really don’t know,’ said Beth; ‘If it was a religion of long standing, [who are we to judge]?’”

“For a moment, I couldn’t even respond,” reports Ms. Haugaard. “This woman actually couldn’t seem to bring herself to say plainly that she was against human sacrifice. My classes of a few years before would have burst into nervous giggles at the suggestion. This class was calmly considering it.”

At one point, a student explained she had been taught not to judge, and if this practice worked for them, who was she to argue differently.

Appalled by the student’s moral indifference, Ms. Haugaard concludes, “Today, for the first time in my thirty years of teaching, I looked my students in the eye and not one of them in my class could tell me that this society, this cultural behavior was a bad thing.” […]

Read the whole thing.

Supposedly we live in a society of modernity. Yet, those who should be protecting our society are dropping the ball, much to the bloody consequence of others…

School And Mental Health Officials Knew For Eighteen Months That Cruz Was Dangerous [VIDEO]

Broward County’s Reverse Jail-to-School Pipeline

Deputy and Counselors Recommended Institutionalizing Nikolas Cruz Long Before School Massacre

It’s all about the organized formal indoctrination of our youth…

Student Assaulted for Pro-Second Amendment Views, Then Suspended for Defending Himself

But then you have liberals, even Congressmen, suggesting the possibility of liquidating political opposition.

MORE:

How the #MeToo movement is backfiring on campus

From Suffrage to Suppression: Women Now Lead in Anti-Speech Sentiment

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