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Dangerous and ‘Deplorable’ National Security Breakdown at USCIS

digital-fingerprint-ashford-university

Keep in mind all these people were on the list ordered to be deported or removed … DEPORTED. This was no ‘accident’. Not with this administration.

And this cannot be ‘fixed’ simply by revoking the errant citizenships. No, “fraud” must first be determined and it must go through the court system which takes time and more of our money… Hey, compare THAT shit to you and I having to prove to the IRS we aren’t tax cheaters while they run roughshod over our personal finances/property. These non-legal “citizens” have the full luxury of enjoying what the hell ever this government/administration ‘entitles’ them with, just as they do all illegal aliens…

Washington (CNN) – The number of individuals who were supposed to have been deported but were instead granted citizenship is far higher than was initially reported by media covering the Department of Homeland Security Inspector General’s office report on the matter.

On Monday, the Inspector General reported that 858 individuals from “special interest countries” — meaning countries that are considered to be “of concern to the national security” of the US — were supposed to have been deported but were instead granted US citizenship.

But the truth is the report is even worse than reported, with more than 1,800 individuals naturalized who should have been deported from the country.

A reason for the underplaying of the number may have been the report’s focus, which was whether the US Citizenship and Immigration Services was using digital fingerprints effectively. The Inspector General determined that the agency granted citizenship to 858 individuals who had been ordered deported or removed under another identity but “their digital fingerprint records were not available” during the naturalization process.

But a footnote on page one of the report also states that there were, as of November 2015, an additional 953 individuals about whom the Inspector General couldn’t determine if there was a problem with the fingerprint records specifically, but also should have been deported. This other group consisted of members of a slightly broader classification, from countries of concern as well as from neighboring countries where there is a history of fraud.

That amounts to a total of 1,811 individuals granted citizenship who should not have been.

The Department of Homeland Security responded to the report, saying it would review all 1,811 individuals “out of an abundance of caution.”

Monday’s report drew condemnation from many Republicans in Congress, including Sen. Ben Sasse, R-Nebraska, who said “a bureaucracy that blunders so badly is one that doesn’t take our national security seriously.”

The White House said Tuesday it’s “clear” some systems need improving following a glitch with DHS’ fingerprint system that led to hundreds of people inadvertently being granted citizenship. […]

And you know even the adjusted up total number of 1,811 is low-balling.

Know what? I seriously DO NOT want to hear (again) those federal employees involved in this over 1800 foreigners who were ordered deported or removed from the US but given US citizenship, telling the American people/Congress that their stupid system was not modernized because of lack of funding … and they already have tried to blame lack of funding. This nation is in something like over $20T in debt. There is no financial excuse any federal agency (sans the US Military who has suffered drastic cuts) not to have had enough money to update and run the most efficient systems possible. Always … ALWAYS … when the agency involved has its expense books audited we find millions and millions of taxpayer dollars of that department’s funding used for ridiculous travel and partying and/or artwork and furnishings spending. So don’t you dare sit there and blame this on “funding”.

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One comment on “Dangerous and ‘Deplorable’ National Security Breakdown at USCIS

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